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Wagga Wagga practice manager recognised for contribution to GP training

Home / Wagga Wagga practice manager recognised for contribution to GP training

Dec 11, 2018 | Latest news | Media releases

Training the next generation of GPs takes a team, and at GP Synergy’s Seasonal Celebration and Awards Night in Canberra on Friday night outstanding GP registrars, GP supervisors and practice managers were recognised. Michelle Dean, Trail Street Medical Centre Practice Manager, was recognised as GP Synergy Practice Manager of the Year for Murrumbidgee and ACT....

Training the next generation of GPs takes a team, and at GP Synergy’s Seasonal Celebration and Awards Night in Canberra on Friday night outstanding GP registrars, GP supervisors and practice managers were recognised.

Michelle Dean, Trail Street Medical Centre Practice Manager, was recognised as GP Synergy Practice Manager of the Year for Murrumbidgee and ACT.

With 12 years of experience as a practice manager, Ms Dean has been with Trail Street Medical Centre since its establishment seven years ago. During that time the practice has supported many GPs in training.

“I’m flattered to be recognised for this award.

“I started as a trainee medical receptionist working in general practice more than 20 years ago.

“I enjoy the challenge of working with the GP registrars who train with us, to share my knowledge and experience of general practice.

“I’m motivated by patient care and hope I can support the registrars and make their experience through general practice as pleasant as possible,” Ms Dean said.

John Oldfield, GP Synergy CEO, said there are currently more than 110 general practices accredited to train registrars across the Murrumbidgee and ACT region.

“The role of practice managers, in practices maintaining their training accreditation and in supporting the training of GP registrars, is immensely important.

“In addition to helping registrars navigate the behind-the-scenes workings of general practice, it is often practice managers that help registrars and their families settle into new towns for their training.

“If registrars realise what a great part of the world this is to live and practise in during their training they are more likely to stay here once they complete their GP training,” Mr Oldfield said.