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New GPs start their training in Wagga Wagga

Home / New GPs start their training in Wagga Wagga

Feb 20, 2019 | Latest news | Media releases

There are some new faces in general practices around Wagga Wagga with six new GP registrars starting their community-based training this term. The fully qualified doctors will spend three-to-four years training to become specialist GPs with local GP training provider GP Synergy. They join 26 doctors who are in various stages of their training under…

There are some new faces in general practices around Wagga Wagga with six new GP registrars starting their community-based training this term.

The fully qualified doctors will spend three-to-four years training to become specialist GPs with local GP training provider GP Synergy. They join 26 doctors who are in various stages of their training under the supervision of local GPs.

One of the new faces in town, Dr Millie Holbeck who is training at Blamey Street Surgery, has relocated from Sydney and is keen to make Wagga Wagga home.

“Since I started medicine I knew I wanted to be a GP and I knew I wanted to go somewhere smaller where I could be part of the community and I could make more of a difference.

“One more GP in the big city doesn’t do much, but one more GP somewhere where there aren’t too many, can make more of a difference.

“My heart was set on training in this region, my sister came to Uni here and I just loved the area.

“The first week at the practice has been exactly how I hoped it would be.

“It’s so nice, you might see one patient come in today and then their brother come in the next day, you treat the whole family and get to know everybody, you get to be that quintessential family GP,” Dr Holbeck said.

GP Synergy CEO, John Oldfield, said to support the registrars in meeting local community health needs GP Synergy delivers regionalised training delivered by local medical education teams.

“Across the Murrumbidgee region, there are we are currently 67 GP Synergy GP registrars in various stages of training.

“Supporting rural training pipelines for doctors with rural backgrounds, and encouraging doctors from metropolitan areas to experience rural general practice, is essential to building a sustainable primary care workforce,” Mr Oldfield said.