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New GPs settling into training in Western NSW

Home / New GPs settling into training in Western NSW

The Western NSW medical community is getting a boost with thirty doctors starting their journey to become specialist GPs. The doctors met in Dubbo this week for a workshop to mark the start of their three-to-four years of training.

Drs Rebecca Devitt and Emily Hedditch have both chosen Western NSW for their training and will start their training in GP practices in Mudgee and Orange.

For Dr Devitt it’s both a homecoming and chance to make a difference as a rural GP.

“I grew up in the area and have worked here as a pharmacist and then as a junior doctor.

“I know that the towns in Western NSW are welcoming, and great places to live and raise a family.

“I think that we have such an opportunity to influence healthcare outcomes here, there’s a lot of evidence that access to primary healthcare and GPs is a gauge for the health and wellbeing of the community.

“I’m hoping to live and work in the area long term and so I feel Western NSW is the best place to do my GP training,“ Dr Devitt said.

Dr Hedditch’s experience of Western NSW came via extended family members.

“I have family in Molong and Orange and have always known about the struggles some of my family members have had when needing to access healthcare.

“It’s driven me to pursue a career as a rural GP, I really want to be able to provide a service to a community of need.

“Western NSW also has great local services, industry and everything that a young family could need so it seemed like the perfect choice for my husband and I to settle down,” Dr Hedditch said.

Local GP training organisation GP Synergy CEO, John Oldfield, said that rural GP registrars often have a diverse set of skills and knowledge that are further developed during GP training.

“To support the registrars in meeting local community health needs GP Synergy delivers regionalised training delivered by local medical education teams consisting of GPs based in Western NSW.

“During training the registrars work in local GP practices with 122 GP registrars currently in various stages of training throughout the region.

“It’s also important for local communities to welcome and support new doctors as they settle into rural towns, as we’d all be pleased to see the doctors stay here in the longer term,” Mr Oldfield said.

 

For more information please contact:

Kerryn Stephens | Media and Communications Officer