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New GP registrar receives a warm welcome in Kandos

Home / New GP registrar receives a warm welcome in Kandos

Feb 8, 2017 | Latest news | Media releases

Dubbo is playing host this week to 43 doctors training to specialise as rural GPs at a general practice education workshop run by local training provider GP Synergy. Attending the workshop is Dr Mohammed ‘Mo’ Abdallah, who will be the first GP registrar to train in Kandos at the newly accredited training clinic, Kandos Family...

Dubbo is playing host this week to 43 doctors training to specialise as rural GPs at a general practice education workshop run by local training provider GP Synergy.

Attending the workshop is Dr Mohammed ‘Mo’ Abdallah, who will be the first GP registrar to train in Kandos at the newly accredited training clinic, Kandos Family Medical Practice.

“I’ve been in Kandos since October, everyone in the area has pitched in to settle my family with lots of invitations and advice,” Dr Abdallah said.

Dr Abdallah is one of the 148 GP registrars training with GP Synergy in hospitals and local general practices across Western NSW.

“Across the Western NSW region we partner with more than 70 general practices and hospitals to ensure the next generation of GPs are highly skilled medical practitioners that contribute to healthier communities,” GP Synergy Director of Education and Training Dr Vanessa Moran said.

Training to become a general practitioner takes 3-4 years under the federally Australian General Practice Training (AGPT) program delivered by GP Synergy in NSW/ACT.

Qualifying as a doctor in Iraq, Dr Abdallah left the war-torn country for England in 2006 where he worked in the hospital system.

However, the cold English weather and limited time spent with each hospital patient drew him to Australia and rural general practice.

“I have a mate from medical school who is training to be a GP in Cessnock who recommended Australia, and the English weather was the deciding factor.

“It’s the holistic nature of general practice that attracts me. Working in hospital emergency departments means you are generally dealing with consequences, and your time spent with a patient may be quite brief.

“I’m now sharing the local hospital responsibilities in a week-on week-off arrangement, when the nurses tell me a patient’s name I often already know them through the general practice.

“It’s really the best of both worlds,” he said.
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For more information and high res images please contact:
Kerryn Stephens | Media and Communications Officer
P: 02 4201 0243 | M: 0428 261 826 | E: kerryn_stephens@gpsynergy.com.au