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New doctors learn about life on the farm

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Nov 10, 2017 | Latest news | Media releases

If you’ve grown up in the city a day on the farm can be a great introduction to the realities of rural life. Forty GP registrars who are in their first year of GP training in Western NSW with GP Synergy, visited Extraordinary Pork at Eumungerie on Wednesday to get a better understanding of working...

Dr Paul Lunney and Farmer Michael

If you’ve grown up in the city a day on the farm can be a great introduction to the realities of rural life.

Forty GP registrars who are in their first year of GP training in Western NSW with GP Synergy, visited Extraordinary Pork at Eumungerie on Wednesday to get a better understanding of working the land.

Raised in Sydney, a year at the School of Rural Health set Dr Paul Lunney on the path to becoming a rural GP.

Undertaking a training placement at Dubbo Family Doctors, Dr Lunney finds the diversity of general practice both challenging and stimulating.

“General practice draws on all areas of medicine – no two days are the same.

“As agriculture is an integral part of country NSW, GPs need to have an appreciation of the occupational risks and health implications involved.

“We need to play our part in promoting farm safety and positive workplace practices to our patients,” Dr Lunney said.

Farmer Michael from Extraordinary Pork played host to the registrars, giving them a behind the scenes tour of the paddock to plate pork operation. This included a farm safety demonstration providing an insight into the scale and dangers of machinery used.

“We want these young doctors to have a better understanding of the complex business of farming and the challenges farmers face every day,” Farmer Michael said.

Dr Anna Windsor Regional Head of Education Western NSW said it is important for doctors to understand the communities they will work in.

“GP Synergy is committed to supporting registrars to not only receive the best medical training, but also become part of the community and realise what a great part of the world this is to live and practise in.

“Understanding the physical and mental challenges of working in rural areas, will really help these young doctors in their day-to-day work,” Dr Windsor said.