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Wollongong GP registrar tops GP exam

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Oct 28, 2016 | Alumni | Latest news | Media releases | Medical students | Prevocational doctors | Registrars | Stakeholders | Training practices

Wollongong GP registrar, Dr Toby Jackson, has been announced as the highest scoring candidate in NSW/ACT in the recent Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) fellowship clinical exam. Toby is currently training at the Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service, and is nearing the end of his three year specialist GP training with the local training...

toby_jackson_gp_synergyWollongong GP registrar, Dr Toby Jackson, has been announced as the highest scoring candidate in NSW/ACT in the recent Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) fellowship clinical exam.

Toby is currently training at the Illawarra Aboriginal Medical Service, and is nearing the end of his three year specialist GP training with the local training provider, GP Synergy.

“Fellowship examinations are the final assessments in a doctor’s journey to becoming a fully qualified specialist GP,” says GP Synergy Director of Education and Training, Dr Graham Lee.

“Passing these exams signifies that a doctor is competent and able to provide high quality care as an independent general practitioner.

“To obtain the highest score in this assessment is a significant achievement and we warmly congratulate Toby on his success.”

After a few years travelling and working as locum, Toby returned to Wollongong in 2015 to pursue a career as a general practitioner.

“General practice provides a flexible career with a broad range of working opportunities,” says Toby.

“It offered a broad scope of practice from prevention and health promotion to the treatment of acute and chronic conditions.

“I’ve always wanted to work in the community rather than in a hospital. I liked the idea of looking after ‘the whole’ patient rather than specialise in a single field.”

Toby has always had a special interest in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. Following his internship at Wollongong Hospital, he spent several years locuming in remote primary care where he worked in Christmas Island, and with Aboriginal communities in Palm Island and the Ngaanyatjarra Lands in the Gibson Desert.

“Aboriginal health is satisfying and rewarding work. I believe it’s a real opportunity to improve people’s health outcomes. You get to manage complicated and difficult conditions and there is a focus on preventative medicine. I would absolutely recommend the experience.”