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Armidale networks to welcome new GPs

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Sep 27, 2018 | Latest news | Media releases

Doctors who have moved to Armidale to train to become specialist GPs, received a warm welcome on Tuesday night. A networking event to help GP registrars settle into town, coordinated by general practice training provider GP Synergy, brought together more than 50 local health professionals and community representatives, including the Member for New England Barnaby...

Doctors who have moved to Armidale to train to become specialist GPs, received a warm welcome on Tuesday night.

A networking event to help GP registrars settle into town, coordinated by general practice training provider GP Synergy, brought together more than 50 local health professionals and community representatives, including the Member for New England Barnaby Joyce.

Mr John Oldfield, GP Synergy’s CEO welcomed guests, encouraging them to get to know the GP registrars who are spending three to four years in additional training.

“There are eight doctors who have moved to the local area to undertake their training.

“They are under the supervision of local GPs in their clinics,” Mr Oldfield said.

Dr Nikita Naik has spent this year training at Integral Health, where she is finding general practice to be a rewarding, challenging and diverse career.

“I work in an incredibly supportive environment with a great group of GPs, and other staff, who have a wealth of knowledge and experience under their belts.

“I’m trying to absorb as much as I can during my time here and it’s allowing me to develop into the type of medical practitioner I’ve envisioned myself to become,” Dr Naik said.

Dr Naik has been working under the supervision of accredited local GPs Drs Vicki Howell and Jennifer Hebblewhite.

“We’re committed to training the next generation of GPs because we really believe in our community and we’re really working towards retention of registrars for all rural communities.

“Research informs us that registrars, and medical students, when they spend a longer time embedded in rural communities are far more likely to go on and become rural practitioners,” Dr Howell said.

“It’s also wonderful to be a role model for the next generation, and to pass on your skills, we also learn a lot from our registrars,” Dr Hebblewhite said.

Mr Oldfield explained that GP Synergy is committed to supporting registrars and their supervisors to ensure that the GPs starting their careers receive the best medical training.

“We also provide assistance to registrars moving to rural locations to settle in, and this event is a good opportunity for the new doctors and their partners to meet locals and make connections in the community,” Mr Oldfield said.